Welcome to EatTheWeeds.com

by Green Deane

in Blog

If you would like to donate to Eat The Weeds please click here.

{ 29 comments… read them below or add one }

Joyce May 1, 2012 at 22:47

Thank you, Mr. Deane, for your wonderful foraging class in April 28. It was fun meeting you and learning about all those plants and edible insects. By the way, here is the info you requested: shell ginger leaves, brewed as a decoction, make a great wash for wounds, according to one of my neighbors( who happens to be from the Caribbean). I couldn’t find any references, so I’ll just have to take her word for it. In the meantime, good luck with your work and travels!

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Christopher Wanjek March 8, 2012 at 21:38

I’d like to know more about “environment” in the ITEMize ritual. I’m in Baltimore city. I can avoid car exhaust by sticking to alleyways. But I can never really tell where the dogs and cats have been.

Assuming that I cook what I forage (sonchus, dandelion and such), how dangerous is animal urine? I get a lot of broken glass, too, but I don’t see that as a toxin.

-chris

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Green Deane March 8, 2012 at 21:59

While animal urine is not a pleasant notion things from humans are a greater concern such as cadmium, abestos, lead et cetera. I would not worry about glass except physically if one got small shads internally.

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robert February 21, 2012 at 21:40

me and my sister have beenlooking up info on jewl weed we no it help wit poison ivy but is there any thing else we could find out about it? thank you love your site

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Green Deane February 22, 2012 at 16:44

The cultivated plant called Impatients are Jewelweed and have edible blossoms. See Edible Flowers: Part Two

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Lord Binque XIX February 12, 2012 at 18:08

Great site, Dean! America needs more latter-day Eull Gibbonses like you. Will check back frequently!

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Scott Baso November 8, 2011 at 20:59

Fantasic new site Dean. I really enjoy all the knowledge you dispense. I like to juice fruits and vegetables, could you maybe add a topic on juicing wild edibles. Thanks for all your efforts.

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Retired Geezer November 4, 2011 at 00:40

Nice looking website, very intuitive.

I liked your video on reclaiming cast-iron pots by electrolysis, I bought some Washing Soda and will try that this week.

Here’s my vote for a self-published book also.
Hope you wander up to the Spud State sometime. We have Patrick McManus, I bet you two would get along fine.

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Beau October 24, 2011 at 23:16

Hooray for Green Deane!
I found you with a google search a couple years ago about wild onions and garlic. So happy you have a site I can use with Google Reader!

Thank you for hours of wonderful and humorous videos. My kids enjoy watching and learning, too.

Toodles! πŸ™‚

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Tecca October 16, 2011 at 01:39

I think your website is very cool, and I have a small recomendation to add to your eat the weeds videos. Try doing a video on the edibility of bamboo, especially a native species such as Arundinaria gigantea or Arundinaria tecta. I know the young shoots and seeds are palatable. Also try doing American hazel nut/Corylus Americana. Once again great vids and website!

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Green Deane October 16, 2011 at 06:16

I hadn’t thought of doing one on banboo, and I grow some in my back yard. When on sprouts perhaps I will (now I have to go watch the patch.)

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Freddallas October 15, 2011 at 23:03

Thank you. Not since I was in Boy Scouts or picked up “Stalking the Wild Asparagus” have I had so much fun. Keep’em coming! Dallas, Texas is my home now, but I grew up in Fairplay, Texas… long ago.
Does your website have a DONATION BUTTON yet?
I agree with you that the treated lumber is NOT Green Deane… you need a website border that reflects you sitting in the Weeds like on the videos that I now share with the 10 year old grandson living with us now.

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Carrol M. October 15, 2011 at 01:22

First of all thank you so much for sharing your knowledge in identification and utilization of wild edibles. I find myself more and more looking more closely at the flora on my foray’s into nature now. Perhaps in the future you might produce information based on the different regions of the U.S. I live in the Post oak Belt of north east Texas and know that the Flora is different than just 100 miles in either direction east or west from the Piney Woods and the Mesquite brush country. Thank’s again for sharing your knowledge on this rare and unique area and looking forward to more episodes of Eat the Weeds and or the book suggested above.

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Justin October 14, 2011 at 22:28

Awesome new site, I really like it a lot. Thank you for all of the videos, too.

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scott October 12, 2011 at 08:44

Hello,
Thank you very much, you are amazing, and very generous. You are giving so much. I think a field guide would be a huge seller. I am trying to save for transportation, and when i finally get some I’m going to sign up for your class. I was watching a documentory on the great deppression and it said people were starving to death, because the farmers had no money to plant crops and the fields were nothing but weeds…lol. Atleast now if that happens again your readers will not starve, because of you. Thank you again so much you have also saved and free’d me from dependancy to the grocery store. Toodles. Scott

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RackAttack October 12, 2011 at 07:11

Hey Green Deane, congrats on the new website! It’s looking sharp.

I’m still following all your videos, and looking forward to this site and any other future endeavors that you are working on.

Good job!

Tootles. πŸ˜‰ (Oh, wait… That’s your thing, uhh… See ya later, lol.)

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Green Deane October 12, 2011 at 07:20

thanks… we have much planned… adding stuff weekly… hang in there, we have great things to come…

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Helen McConnell October 11, 2011 at 21:16

Love the new website! Can’t wait for all the new changes. I still have Pawpaw and Lambsquarters seeds if your interested.

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Green Deane October 11, 2011 at 21:23

Thanks for writing… as for the seeds… yes, perhaps after our cold weather…

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RICHARD October 11, 2011 at 11:54

IF YOU EVER PUT ALL THIS IN A BOOK WITH COLOR PHOTOS YOU WOULD MAKE A ZILLION DOLLARS AND I WOULD BUY THE FIRST ONE. IT WOULD BE THE BEST SURVIVAL BOOK ON THE MARKET.

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Green Deane October 11, 2011 at 18:48

Thanks. Not a bad idea. I just might self-publish. I had two books published back in the1990s and the publisher got 14/15ths of the profits. That’s not a typo. The publisher got 14/15ths and then my agent got a cut out of my 1/15th.

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cynthia September 21, 2012 at 13:33

you could have a written book to download, attached to a paypal account that customers logged onto and paid for the download by credit card…then sent you in a code number, you check to see if the payment is there and you download or send the “book” to their email…which they then would print out? doable? worth a try?

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Jack Williams October 10, 2011 at 12:09

Thank you Mr. Green Deane For the easiest way ever of plant identification. Books don’t make it real, you do.
From another central Floridian, see ya in the woods.

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Green Deane October 10, 2011 at 12:12

Thanks for writing. I apprediate that. I started out my career as a teacher and some of that lingers on.

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fred zimmermann October 10, 2011 at 11:41

congratulations green deane!!! what a great resource…thank you for all your time and effort πŸ™‚
your friends from port saint lucie
fred , missy , and anna

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Green Deane October 10, 2011 at 11:46

Thanks… we’ve got a lot of changes and updates planned. It just takes a bit of time.

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Phillip Coxwell October 10, 2011 at 13:37

LOVE the new site. It looks good, easy to navigate, and is still full of tons of useful info! I’m sure it’s going to continue to help me learn more on foraging and hopefully one day I’ll get somewhat decent at it!

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Jon Singletary October 10, 2011 at 13:13

Congrats on the new web site, and Thanks for all you do.

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Danny Rodrigues October 9, 2011 at 06:43

Thank you for helping ordinary people with the extraordinary.
So glad to have found you.

Sincerely,

Dan

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