Common Non-Edible Plants

by Green Deane

Not Edible

While some 93% of plants are not edible this page was created to show some of the more common non- edible plants I am asked about often or have been sent to me to identify. They are listed  in botanical alphabetical order. Visit the Green Deane Forum to help get plants identified.

NOT EDIBLE: Argemone mexicana, the Mexican Poppy, can be yellow or white. Used extensively in herbal applications but not edible. Locally a very limited season, usually winter.
NOT EDIBLE. The Harlequin Glorybower, Clerodendrum Trichotomum, has a very showy calyx. A native of Asia, Clerodendrum means fate tree, referencing questionable medical uses, and trichotomum which means three trunks, which it apparently has often.
NOT EDIBLE: Crotalaria spectabilis, the rattlebox because of the sound the seeds make in a dry pod. Quite toxic for man and beast. The entire genus is toxic, from little rabbitbells to the rattleboxes.
NOT EDIBLE. Cynanchum laeve is also called the Honeyvine. I receive a lot of emails from folks who want to know if this is edible milkweed vine. It is not. The sap can irritate and damage eyes and mucus membranes and if consumed can stop your heart. To read about the edible milk vine, click here.
NOT EDIBLE. Fatoua villosa, the mulberry weed, an import on nursery plants, was first noticed in Louisiana in 1964. It is controlled by mulching. It can cause mild itching. Also called the Hairy Crabweed.
Not Edible: Earth Smoke, or Ground Smoke, Fumaria officinalis. The native of Europe found in most of North America has many medicinal uses beyond the scope of this site. The flowers yield a yellow dye good for coloring wool.
NOT EDIBLE. Often confused with either a Commelina or a Tradescantia is the Gibasis geniculata, also called the Tahitian Bridal Veil though it is a native of Central America. To read about the Tradescantias click here.
NOT EDIBLE: There are many toxic plants and one that causes nearly instant blisters even blindness is Giant Hog Weed, Heracleum mantegazzianum.Highly invasive it can produce 20,000 seeds per plant. Furocoumarins in the sap can cause a skin reaction called phyto-photodermatitis. This causes the skin to be very sensitive to ultraviolet light. It caues swelling and blistering and can lead to permanent scarring. Contact with the eyes can cause temporary or permanent blindness
NOT EDIBLE: Ligustrum lucidum, the Waxy or Glossy Privet. While there are not human trials to support this  In vitro studies have shown that the fruits of Ligustrum lucidum have antitumor, immunostimulatory, antioxidative, antiviral, antimutagenic, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic  properties.
NOT EDIBLE. Lupinus diffusus, endangered, also called Oak Ridge Lupine, Spreading Lupine, or Skyblue Lupine, grows in dry areas.
NOT EDIBLE: Wavyleaf Basket Grass, or Oplismenus hirtellus ssp. undulatifolius. This is a a common ground cover locally usually found in shady areas. Originally from Asia it is found throughout the south. Folks are always wondering what it is. Now you know.
NOT EDIBLE: Phoradendron serotinum, Mistletoe. While Mistletoe has been used in some herbal medications it is generally considered toxic. 
NOT EDIBLE: Ricinus communis, the Castor Bean, is not a bean but it is one of the deadliest plant escaped from cultivation. While there are many species with palmate leaves it has eight radiating leaflets with small teeth. the Castor Bean grows soft-spine fruits with mottled seeds from which the source of the poison ricin. One milligram of ricin can kill and adult. If death has not occurred in 3-5 days, the victim usually recovers. 2354195-ricinus-communis-leaf
NOT EDIBLE: Salvia cocinnea, the Scarlet Sage. It has several whorls of red flowers that form an interrupted flower spike on a square stem. It’s a showy southern native that has a sage-like aroma and is found in the hot sands of the South. Even a small amount of the blossomed consumed can make you quite ill. The blossom is red for a reason. Leave it alone.
NOT EDIBLE. Butterweed, Senecio glabellus, can from a distance resemble wild mustard or wild radish. On close inspection it does not look like them. The blossoms are not a yellow cross and the leaves are not sandpappery. It is also laced with pyrrolizidine which is an alkoloid that can damage your liver. To read more click here.
NOT EDIBLE: Solanum viarum, Solanum ciliatum, Solanum carolinense, all called Tropical Soda Apple or Horse Nettle, the first two turn red when ripe, the latter yellow. They usually start out with mottle green fruit. Some are toxic when green, others more toxic when ripe. Edibility is doubtful, botantical references vague, identification difficult. Best avoided. Of the three ripe S. ciliatum, now called Solanum capsicoides, might not kill you.

{ 89 comments… read them below or add one }

joe May 17, 2016 at 10:32

I was wondering if you know of any non edible plants with a quantity of arganine? I am looking into aquaponics with a fish that requires it, so I was looking at suplimenting the vermiculture with a plant material containing it. Thanks in advance

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Rob Pitts May 7, 2016 at 23:06

I have a plant that started growing out of nowhere in the last 2 years in my back yard; it looks like a fern and grows to about 6 feet, if I squeeze the leaves it has a strong medicine smell like you would smell in a medicated hair treatment shampoo?(we own a hair salon) it has a very stinky blossom when full grown. I have dried the leaves and tasted with the tip of my tongue and my throat became numb for about 15 minutes. I have asked at a 4 different nursery’s in my area and no one is familiar with it? we live in north west Virginia. any ideas

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Ed April 18, 2016 at 11:27

Is there any value in the Dog Fennel weed?

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Green Deane April 18, 2016 at 12:48

If you mean eating it, my advice is do not eat it. It might have occasional value internally as a medicine. It has external value medicinally. See my article Pyrrolidines On My Mind.

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Emma Grace March 3, 2016 at 10:16

I love your website! Plz keep posting newsletters.

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Emma Holmes March 1, 2016 at 11:00

Thank you so very much! Your website is so helpful.

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Gerald Young February 17, 2016 at 06:26

I enjoyed reading your article but you should have included the area where they can be found, I don’t recognize much here that might grow in the mid west to east coast

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Green Deane February 17, 2016 at 08:57

Stating geographically where plants grow, or do not, is a monumental task that borders on impossible. Plants that grow everywhere — wild mustard for example — is easy. Plants that grow in one area are easy, such as the Yellow Anise along the St. Johns Rive in Florida. Other plants can be spread far and wide, in 2000 counties, or five states, or 56 countries… it’s a staggering amount of information and research.

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Barry February 18, 2016 at 01:28

Yellow anise has a much larger range than the St Johns River. I had a 20 foot tall specimen growing beside my house in Summerville, South Carolina.

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Green Deane February 18, 2016 at 07:13

That is where it is native. It has been shipped around as an ornamental.

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Gary Honey March 13, 2016 at 09:50

I have several of the plants and I am in Kansas, the belly button of the US. A couple are use in flower gardens, the rest grow wild especially near our wooded and watery areas.

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John November 3, 2015 at 19:27

Salvinia molesta. Is it edible in any way shape or form? One of those invasive species we’re having problems with. I found a study where they fed it to chickens, but that’s all I got.

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Green Deane November 4, 2015 at 06:18

No reference I have says it’s edible.

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Kelly Portert August 30, 2015 at 21:06

Hi There,

I saw on another website that Jasmine Polyanthum flowers were edible too.
Do you know if this is true?
I have had trouble finding the plants of the offinale variety but I can find the polyanthum ones. It’s important that it is defiantly edible as we sell the edible flowers. I would hate to give people the wrong sort.

Regards Kelly Porter

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Green Deane August 31, 2015 at 15:24

I do not have any reference that says Jasminum Polyanthum blossoms are edible. Thus I would presume they are not edible.

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Rion September 8, 2015 at 11:38

We grow two varieties of Jasmine, for fragrance alone, Confederate Jasmine, and Carolina Jasmine – I once decided to taste the buds, and while the yellow didn’t taste horrible, it did not have the mouth-popping flavor that I got when I tried our heirloom roses (those make great rose-petal ice cream!) so I called it a no-go, and the white, which smells almosts intoxicatingly sweet, like a confectionery shop on a warm day, as soon as I bit into the flower, my tongue went numb.

So no, I’d say steer clear of jasmine flowers in general – it turns out “jasmine rice” is flavored/fragranced with something else entirely. *shrugs*.

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David September 22, 2015 at 13:09

Hi, Jasmine rice is named after the lustre of the grains, which is said to be like the sheen on a jasmine flower. It has nothing to do with the flavour.

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Carl March 25, 2016 at 09:07

Carolina jasmine, gelsemium sempervirens, can be fatal. This one has yellow flowers. Trachelospermum jasminoides, called Confederate Jasmine is a member of the Oleander family. Has white flowers.

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dick estes August 2, 2015 at 08:23

What about sickle pod senna? In some books it is poisonous, but according to others, the seeds and leaves have been used as food and medicine

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Roberta July 30, 2015 at 13:22

I love fried squash and pumpkin blossoms. I have a volunteer mellon growing in my garden and wondered if the flowers were edible. I haven”t found anyone that has tried them.

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Simon July 20, 2015 at 08:50

Much appreciated page. My Dr and I have been trying to figure out the blisters I’ve been getting recently. I’d thought chemical burns (decorating) she thought stress. Neither of us thought phyto-dermatitis from the hogweed that grows around the wild raspberries I’ve been collecting.

I only came here for a wine recipe!
Thank you for your hard work.

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Selvakumar July 11, 2015 at 23:45

In Southern part of India, especially in Tamil Nadu, most people will eat leaves of Solanum viarum, Solanum ciliatum, Solanum carolinense, which is useful for Cold (Flu) treatment.

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Gayatri November 5, 2015 at 16:38

What is it called in Tamil/Hindi/Sanskrit, if you know?

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Iris Weaver July 1, 2015 at 12:00

This page of non-edibles is very useful, thank you.

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Raymond White June 20, 2015 at 10:38

The flowers of your Giant Hogweed look a lot like Wild Carrot or even Yarrow. How do you tell them apart?

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Jeremy Chatley January 1, 2016 at 16:40

It doesn’t matter if you can tell the difference, they are both bad, but i believe the flower for wild carrots always has 1 black dot in the middle but the other plant doesnt

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Hammo June 19, 2015 at 18:26

Wow, I have some of that Castor Plant in my garden (well actually growing from my neighbours garden into mine). Should I remove it, or just manage it?

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Ryan September 13, 2015 at 00:49

The Castor Bean plant is great for ridding mes in the yard also

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Priscilla Swaney May 23, 2015 at 02:08

Castor Bean plant: Every time I read about the castor bean I remember my mom ordering the seeds for this plant. We lived in upstate South Carolina. This would have been in the late 1950’s, they grew as tall as our house. Now I wonder if they were actually castor beans because none of us got sick or died. I remember picking the seed pods which had the soft sticky points on the pods. Is there another plant that could have been confused with what my mom ordered.

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Green Deane May 23, 2015 at 18:35

Did you eat them? Or just touch them?

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Ryan September 13, 2015 at 00:53

Mosquito plants, look just like Castor Bean and grow very tall, even in 1 season. Even seeds look similar.

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Don November 15, 2015 at 18:26

The ricin is pretty much confined to the outer skin of the very hard seed, and is water-soluble. The oil was used in ancient times as an emollient, and today as a biodiesel, in anti-fungal creams… and the oil is widely processed and used as a cheaper substitute for cocoa butter in candy. The seeds are drilled and used as beads, sling-shot ammo by kids, etc. and are generally not considered to be a contact hazard. But why have something around that is potentially so deadly? And attractive to kids…

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Esande May 17, 2015 at 20:39

I dont know whether thhis is angelica or not. If it is not Angelica, then what is it? It grows by and in ditches in south Louisiana. Thanks!!!

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Green Deane May 18, 2015 at 15:20

You might be describing deadly water hemlock.

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David May 17, 2015 at 17:05

There are more edible plants than we think. 93% not edible? HUH?

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Green Deane May 18, 2015 at 15:27

There’s no “huh” involved. Seven percent of 135,000 species is a lot of species.

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David May 17, 2015 at 17:02

Tina, BIRDS eat poison ivy berries… Don’t watch birds! Don’t copy them at all.

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Edith Anderson May 14, 2015 at 19:41

I think we saw a whole patch of those rattleboxes over at Riverbend Park. They were everywhere!

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tina April 26, 2015 at 17:59

I have been told long ago that if in the wild or lost in the wilderness you can tell if certain plants berries etc are edible or not by observing the birds and other wildlife. In other words if they consume it you can too……true or false

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Green Deane April 26, 2015 at 18:35

ABSOLUTELY FALSE. Whoever told you that did not know what they were talking about. Deer can eat poison ivy, squirrels can eat strychnine, chickens can eat arsenic, turtles can eat mushrooms that would kill us. Humans can eat avocados and most other living things can’t.

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Mlvarnell February 14, 2016 at 08:14

There are turtles, eastern box turtle is one, that eats poisonous mushrooms. It nearly wiped out an entire tribe of native American Indians. This has been said before, ‘If you cannot positively identify something, do not touch it, do not eat any part of it.’ Unless you want to join millions of dead folks who have done the same thing in the past, learn or die!

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Green Deane February 14, 2016 at 17:13

I think I mention that aspect on my page on edible turtles (for which I get monthly hate mail.)

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Marty April 27, 2016 at 14:31

Here in Southern California pesky RATS have been thriving on our Hass avocados, so apparently rats aren’t included in “most,” from Green Deane’s above statement. They gnaw on the hard fruit while still on the tree. (Avocados don’t ripen until picked.) Any suggestions for eliminating those nightly visits from RATS would be appreciated.

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Green Deane April 28, 2016 at 14:38

It is the seed the rats leave alone.

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Anne Marie April 25, 2015 at 11:09

Waxy or glossy privet. Not edible, but the description shows many positive and no negative effects…?

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Green Deane April 25, 2015 at 12:58

I have no literature on its edibility nor do I know anyone who has tried it. Thus it stays off the edible list.

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Becky March 15, 2015 at 12:40

Isn’t castor bean the one that produces castor oil? I know of many people who have used the oil as a laxative without harm. So, how could it be poisonous? I enjoy reading your presentation. Very informative.

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Green Deane March 15, 2015 at 14:15

The toxin is processed out of the oil before it is allowed for human use.

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bluebird September 2, 2015 at 18:19

Castor beans are the source of ricin poison.

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karita March 7, 2015 at 20:05

The hog weed, we call it pushki (or wild celery)where I’m from (alaska) and the local’s love to eat it. You have to be careful when picking it and boil it before eating but it is a popular dish there. It’s not uncommon to see little children with scars around there mouths or on their hands from where they tried to eat it without adult supervision. Perhaps not worth the risk most places but on the Aleutians where there are less edible greens to eat it makes sense.

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Aleksandra March 6, 2015 at 11:28

Why might a plant that is not poisonous, and that tastes good, still be classified as “inedible?” One doesn’t usually run across this with berries and fruits, pretty much all of which are classified as either edible or poisonous, regardless of what they taste like. But with foliage, this is quite a different matter. Case in point: There is a native Texas species, now sold as an ornamental throughout the US, called Gaura indheimeri, or “Whirling Butterfly” for its beautiful white or (in a new cultivar) pink blossoms. It is a useful insectiary, but it also has long thin leaves that have a bland but slightly nutty and pleasant taste that would make an excellent salad green, just thick enough to have a bit of a bite, like heavier leaved spinach. The plant is not poisonous to human or animals (according to standard botanical plant databases) but is also listed as being “inedible” pretty much everywhere. I’ve been conducting the traditional edibility test on the plant, and have had not difficulties. So I’m thinking about including this one as a potential food source in my permaculture gardens as a multi-use plant.

Is there anything that I am missing that I should be considering? Why the “inedible” label? Does that just mean that no one in modern agriculture has thought of considering it as a food source? Or is there something else at work here? (By the way, the plant also has no traditional medicinal applications – I already considered that possibility…)

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Green Deane March 6, 2015 at 13:10

As I wrote elsewher ethere can be many reasons why a plant can be non-toxic but inedible. They can be woody, fibrous, tough, lousy taste, very bitter, horrible texture, or does not respond to various ways of cooking… things like that. And… it can take up stuff which makes the adult plant non-edible whereas young plants might be. Another possibility is that it has a chemical or two that over time can cause problems if eaten regularly but appears fine if you eat it rarely. Also the roots of Gaura paravifolia — Velvetweed — were stewed or roasted and eaten by the Navajo.

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feralkevin February 9, 2015 at 09:54

In the book, Paradise Lot, the author describes a Crotalaria longirostrata as an edible species. Do you know anything about that?

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Green Deane February 9, 2015 at 16:56

Cornucopia II on page 103 says: The young shoots are steamed and served whole, the leaves and flowers having been stripped off and eaten separately for their pronounced snap-bean-like flavor. The leaves can be ground with garlic and brushed on bread or added sparingly to white sauce. When added to tamales that are made with butter instead of oil, the flavor combination is said to be unforgettable.

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MD Fairchild January 18, 2015 at 11:28

Hi and thanks for all you do…I enjoyed your fine presentation at Fla herbal conference last year. While looking over the info on wax privet I decided to scan for some articles on the subject. I found 230 pages with appx 20 articles per page covering the broader genus, these are medical model studies not ag centric metrics.. There seem to be several notable effects probably making this a good one for invasives capture / product developments? Enjoy
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25522524
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25017491
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23038995
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19833363

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tblansett November 12, 2014 at 14:32

your picture of the NOT EDIBLE: Ligustrum lucidum, the Waxy or Glossy Privet. looks a lot like grapes, so my question would be is there a very good way to tell the difference if you don’t know for sure. Cause I’m sorry but that picture you have looks exactly like the grapes my grandmother had when I was growing up and we ate them all the time with no problems

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Green Deane November 12, 2014 at 20:25

Look at the seeds. Grape seeds are tear drop shaped.

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Aileen Hampton April 1, 2016 at 03:08

The leaves are extremely different in shape, texture, and shininess. Grape vines also have tendrils; I doubt privet, as a shrub or tree, does.

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Gary October 30, 2014 at 22:28

I found some blue berries with a dark red steam is this berry good to eat or bad

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Green Deane November 1, 2014 at 08:33

They are probably Virginia Creeper berry which are toxic. Do NOT eat them.

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Connie April 7, 2015 at 20:09

Virginia Creeper sap has calcium oxalate crystals in it. Crush the vines and it gets those horrid tiny crystals into your skin and you’re going to be covered in burning itching welts for weeks. Horrible horrible plants. And that’s not counting how they strangle other plants and trees.

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bluebird September 2, 2015 at 18:27

Blue/black berries with dark red stems could also be Pokeweed….also not edible. Another example of fruit that birds love that’s not good for people.

You didn’t mention if the plant you’re asking about is a vine or shrubby.

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Pamela Staggs December 7, 2015 at 11:21

I also have a plant in my yard that looks like that. Come to find out it was nightshade. The inside almost looks like a tomato, except it is purple.

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tonya sumner September 25, 2014 at 15:42

Is there a non edible green bean. My daughter has recently moved to a new home and there are green bean looking plants growing on a fence in her back yard. I thought maybe they were purple hull peas but she said the dark ones are not purple but brown and dried with fuzzy beans inside. I could send a pic for identification if you need one. They definitely are not castor beans

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Green Deane December 1, 2014 at 18:37

Yes, there are non-edible green beans. Do you have a picture?

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Carl March 24, 2016 at 20:40

maybe strophostyles? They have fuzzy beans…

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Carrie Teong September 8, 2014 at 00:23

Hi Green Deane,

You have mentioned :

“NOT EDIBLE: Ligustrum lucidum, the Waxy or Glossy Privet. While there are not human trials to support this In vitro studies have shown that the fruits of Ligustrum lucidum have antitumor, immunostimulatory, antioxidative, antiviral, antimutagenic, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic properties.”

Well, will this plant kill ? If not why it’s not use as antidote for cancer ?

Regards,
Carrie

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Roger Buss August 30, 2014 at 20:42

What does elderberry fruit “smell” like? The berries I collected, (I am very nearly certain are elderberry) smell like “mold”.

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Green Deane August 30, 2014 at 21:33

They can smell moldy.

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Sharon Stone Gibson August 26, 2014 at 09:25

Hola from the tropical beaches of Costa Rica, Green Deane. I thoroughly enjoy the knowledge of plants you share with your readers…it so enriches my life. I grew up in North Florida and have always enjoyed wandering around in the woods exploring the flora and fauna. I wish I could attend your upcoming one-day workshop at Florida State College in Jacksonville, but I have been living in Costa Rica for many years now. If you are ever in my area, Guanacaste and would like to explore on our land, just contact me through my website and we will arrange it. We have SO many interesting areas around here to explore and I would love to learn about all the “naturaleza” in my area. Keep the faith and keep up the good work….your readers benefit SO much..!

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Jeanie Haydu August 6, 2014 at 14:52

I am so thankful for this list of non-edibles!! I have a plant in my yard that just appeared. It was rather pretty so I let it go and kept watching it. When it flowered and started producing fruit, I cut in open and it was full of seeds. I could tell by the color it wasn’t ripe because they got yellower as they ripened. When I cut the ripe one, I compared the seeds to every type seed I have in my cabinets. They looked almost exactly like Quinoa!! (I dump my kitchen and bath water on my outside plants). I looked up how Quinoa grows and realized what I have is not only not Quinoa, but dangerous. It is Solanum Carolinense! Or, horse nettle. Thank you for your awesome website!! JH

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John Lerch July 25, 2014 at 14:21

The national arboretum website said Koussa dogwoods have a melon tasting fruit. I have a dogwood that blooms a month later than native dogwoods (same time this harsh spring), and it has fruits that look like the arboretum’s pic of Koussa dogwoods EXCEPT the fruits stand up straight like a candle instead of hanging down. Also they are tasteless instead of tasting like melons. (And they may have made my head swim after putting 3 in mouth to try to get the melon flavor.) Can you enlighten me.

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Green Deane July 25, 2014 at 15:49

Have you read the articles on dogwood on the site?

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edv177 July 22, 2014 at 21:50

just want you to know i love your youtube videos!! i noticed you dont make any more videos : ( ? i am new to foraging an i trying to learn as much as i can about wat i can eat an wat i cant.
im surprised you dont have hemlock or water hemlock? foxglove is another killer. do you think will do a video in the future on hemlock?
thanks for your great work, ive learned a lot from you already

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Green Deane July 23, 2014 at 03:50

If I did a video on hemlock someone would eat it. As it is I do show it on the soldiers creek video and I have a large article about it. Foxglove or the most part is a flower garden plant.

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Lisa Causey (Ryan) July 21, 2014 at 10:52

You need to add poison hemlock. It is easily confused with parsley.

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Green Deane July 21, 2014 at 17:40

I have a separate full page on that. Type hemlock into the search window.

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Teresa Vachon June 24, 2014 at 11:53

The giant hogweed…is there another plant that is similar? In Pennsylvania, mostly along roads, a plant that looks exactly like this but not as high as the one shown on this website. I know a person who used to pick the flower heads off, stick them I
in water, and she never got blisters, blindness, etc from picking and handling them bare-handed. Or do those symptoms only occur if eaten?

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Margaret June 24, 2014 at 14:07

There are many roadside plants that have those umbrella- shaped flower clusters at the tops of their stems, some of them are deadly. To distinguish one from another, examine the entire structure of the plant down to leaf shape, color, presence or absence of fuzz on the stem. If she used the flowers in arrangements, she may have been picking Queen Anne’s Lace. It’s very pretty if viewed without weed prejudice. It’s about waist high, with a fuzzy stem and ferny leaves. Looks and smells like carrot tops.

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Michele Ballantyne June 11, 2014 at 10:50

Hi Deane,
Looks like another website copied your work:
http://myzanestate.com/EdiblePlant/common-edible-plants-in-missouri

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Green Deane June 11, 2014 at 19:18

Happens a lot… which is why I don’t correct my misspellings… that way I know they copied word for word…

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Donna Lenard Putney August 31, 2015 at 16:59

Looks like they copied the pictures too. Shame shame. Is that plagiarism?
Thanks for all the research that you do, Deane. You have helped so many to learn what to eat and what not to eat that lies around us. If there is ever famine for any reason, many of us will now survive/thrive who might have starved had we not known what wild things to eat and how to eat them.

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Michael May 27, 2014 at 22:11

We obviously don’t know enough about plants.
Once I ate over 50 “Rattlebush” Beans, with no adverse effects, as a survival food. I gave them the cautionary poisonous plant test, and it passed. The beans tasted very good. Not even a mild tummy ache or anything. I do not recommend anyone eating them however, as different soils, seasons, age of plant, and unknown sub-species, can affect a plant’s toxicity. As a precaution, I don’t intend to eat any more. 🙂

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Green Deane May 28, 2014 at 06:54

Plants can have chemicals that take some time to do their damage, the tassel flower is a good example. You can eat it with no apparent problem but if continue to eat it it can kill you.

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Nina Peterson May 13, 2014 at 14:44

I know that the leaves of rhubarb have a high concentration of oxalic acid and that makes them “poisonous” however the stem of the bolting flower was quite tasty – a little tart like the rhubarb leaf stems but not overpowering. I peeled and prepared some as a pie filling/pudding and then a few days later passed a kidney stone. Do you think that my eating the rhubarb flower stem had anything to do with the kidney stone?

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Green Deane May 13, 2014 at 16:22

It might have been a tipping point. Who knows, I have no credentials in the medical arena. Does your family have a history of calcium kidney stones?

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scott April 26, 2014 at 13:50

Sir,
I hope to be cross training into S.E.R.E. Sp. for the Cal. Air National Guard. When I get back state side I hope to pick up your DVD’s, but question, in the DVD’s do you also cover NON-EATABLE plants?

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Green Deane April 26, 2014 at 15:44

No, 93% of the plant life is not edible which is more than 100,000 species.

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Erik S. February 5, 2014 at 21:09

Hi Dean,

I attended your course in Winter Park last week with my 2 boys. Thanks so much for starting what I hope is a life long pursuit for my boys. Growing up in Wisconsin I knew of a few edibles but you opened up a whole new world for us.

Hope to see you again soon.

Erik

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