Watercress: Ancient Flavor

10 May 2015

Florida is the Winter Watercress Capital of the U.S. Nasturtium officinale (nas-STUR-shum oh-fis-in-AY-lee ) is one of the oldest leaf vegetables known to be cultivated by man. It’s naturalized in Florida and in fact all of North America, Europe and Asia, the latter two where it is native. Wild watercress is a short-lived edible in […]

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Checkerberry cum Wintergreen

10 April 2015

Array

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Hollies: Caffein & Antioxidants

7 December 2014

Holly Tea With Vitamins A & C This time of year in the South — late fall, early winter —some of the hollies are so scarlet with berries that even the tourists can spot them while doing 85 on Interstate 95, if they bother to look. The hollies, usually Ilex cassine, resemble red torches beside […]

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Cranberries, Lingonberries

23 November 2014

Array

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Roses

15 October 2014

I’m not sure I found wild roses or they found me. Growing up in Maine the local soil was usually either ground-up glacial sand or clay which is decomposed feldspar, or ledge. Not much of a choice if you’re a plant. We had sand, over ledge with a thin veneer of topsoil. And in that […]

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Grapes of Path

11 September 2014

Array

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Chokeberry: Bushy Health Food

22 August 2014

It’s a long ways from the mountains of Maine down the Appalachian Trail to the mountains of western North Carolina. It is also a long ways from ones 20’s to ones 60’s. These distances revealed themselves recently when I notice a plant while hiking in the Smokies. It was familiar but not familiar, a wrong […]

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Chickasaw Plum: Yum

17 June 2014

 Chickasaw Plum: First Springtime Blossom Every spring, three wild plums put on a show locally: The Chickasaw, the Flatwood, and the American. They burst out in white blossoms and no leaves. When in naked bloom they look similar but that’s where the resemblance stops. The Chickasaw and the American go on to produce consistently edible […]

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Can We Eat Grass?

8 January 2014

That simple question has a complex answer: Yes, no, and maybe.  It’s a topic I explored in a recent Green Deane Newsletter and the basis for this article. Strictly speaking we eat a lot of grass, but in the form of grain: Wheat, rice, rye, barley, millet, sprouts et cetera. What most folks want to […]

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A Pitch For Spruce Gum

29 December 2013

Real spruce gum is not easy to chew. It is not soft or sweet. Hard and crumbly is more accurate along with pieces of bark and bits of insects. But if you have good teeth and patience it will in time become a stiff gum. And if you leave it on your bedpost over night […]

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Winter Foraging

15 November 2013

The thermometer was near zero one day when I was on ice skates collecting frozen cranberries. The cranberries were conveniently above the ice just waiting to be harvested. I was on the north end of “Gowen’s Pond” in Pownal, Maine. It was at that end where water seeped into the pond to make the couple […]

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Fireweed Sale

15 August 2013

Array

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Bunya Pine

25 July 2013

The Australian Aboriginals knew a good thing when they tasted it. So did the immigrants. It’s hard to find anyone who doesn’t like the taste of Bunya Pine nuts. But you will find people who don’t like to clean up after it because the ancient species sheds sharp leaves and heavy cones. As a well-fed […]

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Amaranth: Grain, Vegetable, Icon

22 July 2013

 Amaranth, the forgotten food A book could be written about amaranth, and probably has, if not several. A grain, a green, a cultural icon, a religious symbol… amaranth is colorful plant with a colorful history. It’s also nutritious. Amaranth was a staple of pre-Colombian Aztecs, who imbued it with supernatural powers and made it part […]

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